LiveWell®

Wellness and prevention information from the experts at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing


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Finding hope and health through forgiveness

UnconditionalForgivenessLast May, Courtney Baechler, MD, wrote about the important role that forgiveness can play in our health and healing in LiveWell blog entry, Learning to Forgive. She talked about a spiritual teacher and author, Mary Hayes Grieco, who specializes in helping people do just that.

This May 8, the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – Abbott Northwestern outpatient clinic will offer a free event, Springtime in Your Heart: Hope, Humor and Healing, featuring Grieco. She will talk about why forgiveness is a necessary life skill and a good health habit, and she will address the misconceptions people have about forgiveness.

Even better, she will discuss exactly how forgiveness is accomplished, with her eight-step method that works to bring relief.  Grieco will sign both of her recent books, Unconditional Forgiveness and The New Kitchen Mystic.

Don’t miss this enjoyable evening of storytelling, philosophy and self-healing tips!

 


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Looking within: Rediscover joyful living through mindfulness

Calm.Centered.Happy.v2

Multitasking once described what computers did. Now it describes us – living in a world transformed by mobile technology, 24/7 connectivity and instant communication.

“Many of us are in a state of ‘continuous partial attention,’” said Maureen Doran, RD, LD, Mindfulness Training facilitator, Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – Abbott Northwestern Hospital. “In fact, we are taught to splinter our attention and focus on many things at one time.”

We are also trained to look outside ourselves for happiness. “It’s having the right partner, the right job, or the right house and believing that this will bring us happiness and fulfillment, or at least help us avoid suffering,” said Doran.

Yet this way of life may create suffering in the form of chronic stress, said Doran. “There can be a feeling of disconnectedness, that you are living a little outside yourself.” If you develop an illness, have chronic pain or go through some major life stress – like job loss or a death in the family – it compounds the issue. Joyful living seems all but impossible.

Mindfulness is a practice that many see as an antidote to fragmented, crazy-busy lifestyles. Participants learn to stabilize their minds and increase resilience through mindfulness practices such as meditation and yoga. “It’s a way of being present to one’s life, learning to notice what’s going on right in front of you and bearing witness to it in a non-judgmental way,” said Doran, who teaches a four-week Mindfulness Training class.

“Our class participants have overwhelmingly said that Mindfulness Training has improved the quality of their lives and has provided them with tools for living with greater ease, joy, engagement and balance,” said Doran. “We help people recognize and mobilize their inner psychological resources to take better care of themselves, learn new ways of calming themselves, and become more centered and clear-headed.”

Mindfulness research
Research in the field of mindfulness has shown that:
• Consistent mindfulness training can reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol, decrease blood pressure and increase the immune response.
• Those who practice mindfulness experience a greater sense of control in their lives, have increased commitment to daily life, see life events (including illness) as challenges instead of obstacles, and believe that the world is comprehensible, manageable and meaningful.

Mindfulness Training, a program of the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing, is being offered this May in Minneapolis and New Ulm.


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Breaking away from unhealthy American ways

AmericanWays.57300728By Megan Odell, LAc, MS

My professor was new to our school and the United States, having only recently left China. I had the privilege of observing this brilliant acupuncturist as he assessed patients’ concerns and composed treatments.

As he worked on a patient chart one day, he paused and with a big sigh asked, “Why does everyone here have this pattern?”

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the word “pattern” is used instead of “diagnosis.” Where conventional Western medicine works to whittle an illness down to a single cause, TCM instead looks at the whole body-mind ecosystem and attempts to find a pattern to what is happening. A treatment plan is created to restore balance and health.

My professor had noticed that Americans appeared in our clinic with one predominant pattern―Liver-Spleen disharmony. This doesn’t (necessarily) mean there is anything structurally wrong with a patient’s liver and spleen. The issue lies in the functions that the Chinese medical system attributes to those organs.

Patients with Liver-Spleen disharmony might express concerns such as headaches, high stress, digestive difficulties, menstrual pain, irritability, fibromyalgia, or a host of other symptoms.

So, if my professor’s observation was right, what is it about living in the United States (or perhaps an urban area of the Upper Midwest) that makes it so common? In my experience, this pattern is all about four things:

  • Stress: According to TCM, the liver is in charge of the free flow of Qi.  Qi is energy that moves through your body along channels. When you are healthy, the Qi moves freely. When you are in pain, sick or emotionally upset, the Qi can become stuck. When you are in a state of stress, the qi often stagnates (which you might express by clenching your jaw, stopping breathing or tensing your shoulders).
  • Emotions: In TCM, we believe that emotions come and go like water in a stream. If we let them come and express them, everything should be fine. However, sometimes we deny or “stuff” emotions, such as anger, sadness, grief or jealousy. I often speak to people who have semi-successfully hid from emotions for months or years with unintended physical results.
  • Exercise: If we aren’t physically moving, Qi is less likely to move.
  • Food:  In TCM, the spleen is largely attributed with the transformation of food into energy. Some foods, such as soup and lightly cooked vegetables, are easy to transform. Other foods, such as dairy, sugars, and fried foods, are difficult to transform. Eating too much of the latter can bog down the digestive system. And if we do other things while eating (working, reading, driving), the body’s ability to focus energy on digestion is hindered.

Does any of that look familiar? Do you see it in your life or our culture? I would offer that the “American way” often encourages stress, overworking, emotion-stuffing, screen-watching, and food-as-stomach-filler. Even when we try to avoid these things, it is easy to feel pulled in a number of directions in our daily lives. And usually our self-care is the first to go.

So what do we do? TCM offers solutions like acupuncture and Chinese herbs that can help. But improvements from those therapies will only be sustained if lifestyle changes are made, too.

  • Meditate or find another way to manage your stress. Biofeedback and Mindfulness Training are available at the Penny George Institute and offer excellent approaches to handling stress.
  • Feel. Know that your feelings are right, and they are temporary. If you feel you need help processing your emotions, please consider seeing a therapist to help you.
  • Move. It doesn’t have to be high-intensity interval training. Any time you move your body in a way that you enjoy, that is good.
  • Savor. Experience and enjoy your food. Experiment. Slow down. Smell it. Taste it. Eat only enough to feel 70 percent full.

Good luck – together we can work to change the American pattern to one of balance and harmony.

Megan Odell, LAc, MS, is a licensed acupuncturist and offers services at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – Abbott Northwestern.


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Tips on eating well to sleep well

EatingWellThis article originally ran in the LiveWell newsletter of the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing.

The notion that in order to be fit and healthy, your body needs good nutrition applies to more than your waking hours.

“To prepare your body for a good night’s sleep, what you eat throughout the day can have a positive impact on overall energy, mood and the ability to achieve a restorative sleep,” said integrative nutritionist Jeannie Paris, RD, LD. “Good nutrition and good sleep go hand in hand.”

Tips on eating well to sleep well

  • Be careful with alcohol. Alcohol can disrupt sleep and cause fatigue the next day. Limiting alcohol may improve sleep. If you do have an alcoholic beverage, follow it with a glass of water to help rehydrate the body.
  • Serotonin is important to sleep. Serotonin is the “deep sleep neurotransmitter.” It is depleted in the body by alcohol, sugar, stress, caffeine and processed foods. If you are having trouble with sleep, try avoiding caffeinated beverages after lunch. Also try boosting intake of magnesium-rich foods, such as green, leafy vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and sunflower and pumpkin seeds. Magnesium is necessary for the body to process serotonin. Vitamin C, vitamin B6 and folic acid are also needed to synthesize serotonin.
  • Incorporate nutrient-rich foods to help achieve a healthy, restorative sleep. Along with avoiding foods that deplete serotonin, try incorporating foods that give your body tryptophan—an essential amino acid and a precursor of serotonin. These include: cheese, yogurt, eggs, poultry, meat and fish, and also nuts such as pecans, almonds or walnuts. In order to boost serotonin levels, tryptophan needs the help of a complex carbohydrate, such as oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley or yams.
  • Fight fatigue with food. There are many hidden causes to fatigue. Don’t ignore it. It’s important to have chronic fatigue checked out in order to rule out any medical causes. When the body is deficient in certain nutrients, it loses its ability to fight fatigue. These include vitamin D, essential fatty acids, B vitamins, zinc, iron and magnesium. Seek professional help from a nutritionist to learn more about incorporating these nutrients into your diet.
  • Try natural remedies to help with sleep. Certain teas such as chamomile before bedtime or scents such as lavender may help calm the body. Melatonin supplement may also be helpful for falling asleep, however be sure to talk with a health care professional before taking any supplements.
  • Know that sleep challenge changes as you age. Many people experience sleep issues during their 40s or 50s. For women, menopause and perimenopause are often factors. Hormonal fluctuations may cause sleep disruptions or hot flashes during sleep. Good nutrition plays an important role in dealing with these changes. The recommendations on how to address these issues are so individualized that it’s important to talk to a health profession.

To make an appointment with Paris, call the LiveWell Fitness Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital at 612-863-5178 or the Penny George Institute – Unity Hospital at 763-236-5656.