LiveWell®

Wellness and prevention information from the experts at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing

Health benefits of turmeric

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Tumeric.455656335By Mary Beshara, MSN, APRN

If you haven’t already heard about the wonderful health properties of turmeric― the main spice in curry―let me educate you.

Here are results from research showing turmeric’s possible health benefits:

  • The brain – Researchers are exploring the link between turmeric and its positive effects on certain brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Circulation –  A 2007 study showed that curcumin, the yellow pigment that is the active compound in turmeric, may aid in reducing levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), or “bad cholesterol.”
  • Inflammation Researchers at the University of Arizona have found evidence to support turmeric’s reputation as an anti-inflammatory agent for joint inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Cancer – A recent study showed turmeric to be effective in slowing the growth of breast cancer cells in mice and in delaying the progression of the disease into the lungs. The study is being conducted at the University of Texas’ MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.
  • The gut – Turmeric may help people with the digestive disease ulcerative colitis stay in remission, according to a 2006 study.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. I get very excited to see that simple food choices can make a big impact on healthy living. It can be a challenge, though, to get turmeric into your diet. I was raised on a lot of wonderful foods and spices, but turmeric wasn’t one of them. It can be tricky if you are not used to this flavor.

I want to share with you two recipes that are easy ones for getting some turmeric in your diet. They are from the Web site of Arjan Khalsa, a chiropractor.

The first of the recipes is for Turmeric Paste. Once you have this made, you can store it in the refrigerator in a glass container for up to three weeks. You can use it by the teaspoon in soups, yogurt, or eggs ― anything you choose. Experimentation can be your guide. But don’t be surprised if you walk away with a yellow-colored tongue. It’s perfectly harmless and goes away quickly.

The second of the recipes is for golden milk. It is amazingly calming. You can drink it right before bedtime to help with falling asleep. I also enjoy it in the morning while I drive to work. It calms me down, and I like knowing that it is reducing inflammation in my body.

We’re just starting to understand how turmeric can benefit our health.

I do recommend that if you are going to integrate turmeric or curcumin supplements into your diet, please check with your physician or health care professional first. And always consult with them before making any significant changes in your diet or lifestyle.

Mary Beshara is a board certified Clinical Nurse Specialist in adult health and pain management who sees patients at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – Abbott Northwestern Outpatient Clinic. She integrates into her practice complementary therapies such as relaxation techniques, integrative imagery, aromatherapyreflexologyhealing touch and breath work.

 

 

 

 

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