LiveWell®

Wellness and prevention information from the experts at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing


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Have a mindful New Year

Practicing mindfulness is an effective way to manage stress and live more joyfully.

Practicing mindfulness is an effective way to manage stress and live more joyfully.

This article will appear in the Winter 2015 issue of the Livewell® Newsletter of the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing.

After the rush of the holiday season, the first few weeks of the New Year can feel like the slate has been wiped clean. As winter deepens, life in the natural world slows down, too.

Take this opportunity to enjoy the stillness and consider what’s important to you, said Mary Beth Lardizabal, DO, psychiatrist, Allina Health Mental Health – United Clinic, and a group leader of Resilience Training at the Penny George Institute.

Better yet, find a way to bring that calming stillness into your everyday life.

LIVING IN THE PRESENT

One way to do that is to practice mindfulness. “Mindfulness is simply paying attention and being present. It’s not thinking about the past or what might happen in the future. It’s living in the here and now,” Lardizabal explained.

For many of us, living in the present is surprisingly difficult. “Increasingly, we are overscheduled and don’t have time to relax and reflect,” she said.

Technology may be partly to blame. “Endlessly checking your email or social media newsfeed becomes a conditioned habit. You end up missing out on everything else going on around you.” Patterns like this become automatic. “Until you become aware, you can’t interrupt the pattern,” said Lardizabal.

“It’s like unconsciously eating. We keep walking to the refrigerator without thinking about it. Once we catch ourselves, we can make decisions about the behavior.”

HOW MINDFULNESS HELPS

But practicing mindfulness can have an even deeper impact on our lives.

“Self-acceptance and self-compassion is an important part of mindfulness and being self-aware. In this culture, we always want to be more than what we are without really accepting who we are right now,” said Lardizabal. “It’s good to strive for improvement, but if the motivation is because you dislike yourself, it’s a set-up for failure.”

Research confirms the value of mindfulness, said Jeff Dusek, PhD, director of Research at the Penny George Institute. “People who practice mindfulness see normal life events such as illness as a challenge to overcome rather than a roadblock to good health. They also experience a greater sense of self-control in their lives, have increased commitment to daily life, and believe the world is comprehensible, manageable and meaningful.”

Mary Beth Lardizabal, DO, ABIHM, sees patients at Allina Health Mental Health – United Clinic in St. Paul. For appointments, call 651-241-5959.

HOW TO BUILD MINDFULNESS INTO YOUR LIFE

The Penny George Institute offers a variety of programs to help you explore mindfulness and put it to use in your daily life. To learn more, call 612-863-3333.

Program Best suited for:
Resilience Training – Eight-week intensive program that teaches mindfulness-based coping skills in combination with an individualized program of exercise and nutrition. Individuals who have experienced depression, anxiety or other stress-related mental health conditions and are currently in recovery or wish to prevent relapse.
Mindfulness Training – Four-week experiential program offering tools to help manage stress and achieve a higher state of well-being. Individuals who wish to explore new ways to manage stress and optimize their health and well-being.
Guided imagery MP3 albums – Three guided imagery albums focusing on pregnancy, stress management and pain management. Individuals who would like to learn how to benefit from the mind-body connection using electronic tools to improve health and well-being.


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Seven tips for eating healthy this holiday season

Apples in wood bucket for holiday baking

Give yourself the gift of health this holiday using these seven tips for healthy seasonal eating.

The toy catalogs had just been located, and I overheard several of my grandchildren discuss what they wanted for holiday gifts. It took me back to a simpler time when my stocking contained not only a toy and some candy, but also an apple, orange and banana. It was a special day, and those were treasured treats.

Today, healthy food options are readily available. However, these foods often aren’t included in holiday spreads due to a lack of planning, time, know-how or dollars.

We become victims of seasonal weight gain ― controlled by the food, beverages and treats that are placed in front of us. But what would happen if we took control of our nutrition this holiday season?

I know it can mess with a person’s mind to think of the holidays and nutrition at the same time. But one way to do this is to place an emphasis on nutrition, eating less and enjoying food more.

Seasonal nutrition means focusing on healthy foods in your diet that help you avoid mood swings, maintain energy, and improve your ability to handle whatever the season brings your way.

Here are seven tips to get you started:

  1. Indulge in a couple of favorite holiday treats but be mindful when you eat them. Take time to savor the taste and smell, and notice the memories they might conjure up.
  2. Offer to bring a healthy dish to holiday parties to ensure that you will have something nutritious to eat there. Then have just a taste of some of the other more indulgent foods at the event.
  3. Take a colorful variety of vegetables with a dip using plain greek yogurt to gatherings.
  4. Try vegetable appetizers like marinated mushrooms, tomato bruschetta, roasted asparagus or stuffed tomatoes.
  5. Serve pieces of different colored fruits cut up so small fingers can grasp them and enjoy the flavor and juiciness. Did you know that the different colors of food signify their different nutritional benefits?
  6. Put higher calorie, less nutritious foods in smaller bowls with smaller spoons to help ensure smaller portion sizes.
  7. If you need a last minute gift for a favorite friend or family member, consider giving the gift of a cooking class or a session to learn more about nutrition in the coming year.

Barb Brower, RD, LD, CTC, is a registered dietician and integrative health and wellness coach. She sees patients at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – WestHealth and LiveWell Fitness Center.


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Boosting your ability to bounce back: Resilience Training

Resiliency, a concept that is rooted in psychology, is gaining ground as an important component of overall health.

Resiliency, a concept that is rooted in psychology, is gaining ground as an important component of overall health.

Resiliency and its connection to good health was highlighted in a Star Tribune article earlier this year. It explained that resiliency, the ability to bounce back despite life’s challenges, is being embraced for its role in promoting wellness through the mind-body connection.

In the article, Jeff Dusek, PhD, Research director at the Penny George Institute, said that resiliency is becoming more popular “as people are looking to accentuate the positive and improve resiliency as opposed to just reducing depression, anxiety or stress.”

The article also described the experiences of Deb Hitt, whose struggle with chronic pain led her to enroll in the Penny George Institute’s Resilience Training program. The program helped her gain a new perspective and learn new ways to deal with her pain. As Hitt explained in the article, “For a long time I focused on what I couldn’t do and what was hard for me. Today, I define my life by the positives that exist within me — my strengths, my talents and most importantly my resilience.”

Read the entire Star Tribune article, “New approach to wellness – resiliency – is gaining ground.”

The eight-week Resilience Training program is offered regularly at several locations in the Twin Cities. The next session begins Monday, Jan. 19. Call 612-863-0041 to register, or check the Resilience Training schedule for additional sessions.


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Find healing in art

Cranes of hope

Each month, a group of cancer survivors meet to create paper cranes, which are attached to small pocket sized art pieces given away to individuals on a healing journey.

Art is powerful. It can nourish the mind, body and spirit, and it can support healing. That is the inspiration behind a bimonthly Art of Healing exhibit offered by the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing.

The following exhibits are at the Abbott Northwestern Hospital campus through the end of January 2015:

  • Cranes of Hope and Sharing is community collaborative project supported by the Penny George Institute’s Art of Healing program. Each month a group of cancer survivors meet to create paper cranes, which are attached to small pocket sized art pieces to reflect hope and positive statements. The art is given away to individuals on a healing journey to create a full circle of healing. The entire year-long process is documented through photography and will be on exhibit at the Penny George  Institute for Health and Healing – Abbott Northwestern Hospital.
  • Through Angel Foundation’s Teen Outreach program, 12 teen participants were guided by Minneapolis-based photographer Scott Streble to develop techniques that capture and tell their story in images and words. The stirring images reveal the impact of a parent’s cancer diagnosis as seen through the eyes of a teenager. While poignant and at times solemn, this exhibit represents how teens channeled some of their daily feelings into beautiful expressions of resiliency, strength and hope. The exhibit will be on display in the lower level of the Wasie Building outside the LiveWell Fitness Center.

This is the last month to catch the art quilts and haiku of Janet Hovde on exhibit at Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – Unity Hospital. Hovde is an occupational therapist and certified healing touch practitioner. In her own experience with breast cancer, Janet found it useful to create a personal health plan. In this plan, she used art, haiku writing, energy healing, and affirmations to support herself.

The displays are part of the Penny George Institute’s Art of Healing Program, which provides arts-based wellness intervention and education, and supports a healing environment. For more information, call 612-863-9028.