LiveWell®

Wellness and prevention information from the experts at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing


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The surprising power of gratitude

As you go about your day, notice and acknowledge the many reasons you are fortunate. Be grateful to be where you are.

As you go about your day, notice and acknowledge the many reasons you are fortunate. Be grateful to be where you are.

By Pauline Marie Buller, BS, NCTMB, CMLDT, CPMT, CIMT

Gratitude takes practice, but we do get better at it over time. Building it into our daily routine is important because thankfulness is one of the many components of a healthy spirit, mind and body. As the research studies below demonstrate, there is an association between gratitude and well-being.

  • A 2007 study published in the Journal of Research in Personality found that there is a relationship between gratitude and well-being and stated that “gratitude is uniquely important to well-being and social life.”
  • A 2012 study from a group of Chinese researchers looked at the combined effects of gratitude and sleep quality on symptoms of anxiety and depression. They found that higher levels of gratitude were associated with better sleep and lower levels of anxiety and depression.
  • At the University of Connecticut, researchers found that gratitude has a protective effect against heart attacks.
  • According to psychologist and author Robert Emmons of the University of California-Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, gratitude strengthens the immune system, lowers blood pressure, reduces symptoms of illness, increases resistance to pain, correlates with better exercise habits, and encourages us to take better care of our health.
  • Gratitude can also aid in recovering more quickly when you have health issues. In a study of organ recipients, scholars from the University of California-Davis and the Mississippi University for Women found that patients who journal about their appreciation scored better on measures of mental health, general health and vitality than those who keep only routine notes about their days.

Techniques for enhancing gratitude are relatively simple to incorporate into your routine. November is an especially good time to practice being thankful. As we move toward the holidays, extend your thanks-giving with these simple techniques for gratitude and well-being.

How to incorporate gratitude into your routines:

  • As you wake each day, be grateful for lessons learned and mindful as you go about your day.
  • While you are eating a meal, be grateful for your food by savoring each piece with all your senses.
  • Each time you exercise, be conscious of and grateful for what your muscles allow you to do.
  • As you go about your day, whether at work or at home, notice and acknowledge the many reasons you are fortunate. Be grateful to be where you are.
  • When you’ve completed a challenging task in your day, be grateful by treating yourself to a simple foot massage or a few minutes of relaxation and quiet.
  • Say thank you to those around you more often.
  • At the end of each day, journal all the things for which you are grateful and celebrate being just who you are.

Pauline Marie Buller, NCTMB, is an integrative health practitioner with the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing. She provides integrative health services to inpatients at St. Francis Regional Medical Center in Shakopee, Minn., through a partnership with the Penny George Institute. 


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Live well, live happy: how exercise increases happiness

Even a small amount of exercise can make a difference in your happiness and health.

Even a small amount of exercise can make a difference in your happiness and health.

By Mary Farrell, MS, PCC

This is part five in a LiveWell blog series on happiness that launched with “Live well, live happy” in January.

I am excited to share more great news about happiness. As noted previously, most happiness comes not from our circumstances, but from how we think and what we do given our circumstances.

Recently my mother has experienced joint inflammation and pain. She had to cut back on activities, including running around with her grandchildren. I was able to recommend to her a supervised, gentle exercise program. After just a few weeks, she is moving better and is also experiencing a shift in her mood. Her confidence has grown, she feels more hopeful and optimistic, and the return of her joyous laughter makes everyone around her smile.

My mother is experiencing what Sonja Lyubomirsky describes in her seminal publication, “The How of Happiness.” She says “exercise is the single best thing that you can do to improve your happiness.”

Documented benefits of activity include:

  • Enhanced ability to manage stress—Exercise releases norepinephrine, a chemical that moderates the body’s stress response.
  • A boost in “happy chemicals”—Exercise releases endorphins, which produce a feeling of happiness and euphoria. Additionally, exercise can alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety and can sometimes be just as effective as anti-depressants in treating depression.
  • A profound positive effect on your brain—Exercise helps create new brain cells and protects certain brain structures, thereby sharpening memory and focus, and preventing cognitive decline.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem.
  • Increased focus, creativity and energy.

Despite these benefits, you may still have obstacles to building more movement into your life. These tips may help.

  1. Fill in the blank: “I’m too ________ to exercise.” Is it busy? Tired? Old? Overwhelmed? Understanding your primary barrier will help you to work through it.
  • If you are too busy, what is the smallest amount that you could do?
  • If you are tired, experiment with just a bit of activity and see if you get an energy boost.
  • If you are prone to black and white thinking, i.e. “unless I am running, I may as well not bother,” know that research overwhelmingly shows the benefit of even a small amount of movement.
  1. Understand your exercise personality and preferences.
  • Do you love the great outdoors or prefer the climate-controlled comfort of your home?
  • Do you crave time alone or do you do best when with others?
  • Do you prefer joining a class or sports team, or is it easiest to weave in movement during your day?
  1. Start slow, be gentle and build gradually.

Even if it has been a while since you’ve been active, it is never too late to start, or restart. Here’s to happiness through movement!

Mary Farrell, MS, PCC, is an integrative health & wellness coach and an exercise physiologist with the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing’s LiveWell Fitness Center. Call 612-863-5178 to make an appointment with her.

Past entries by Mary Farrell in the “Live well, live happy” series:


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Feeling stressed? Try a two minute time out to regroup

When your circumstances and expectations don't match up, take time to pause, breathe and set aside preconceptions. This can help you gain perspective and take a fresh approach to your situation.

When your circumstances and expectations don’t match up, take time to pause, breathe and set aside preconceptions. This can help you gain perspective and take a fresh approach to your situation.

By Chandler Yorkhall, BA, NCTMB, AOBTA, massage therapist, Penny George Institute for Health and Healing

Two stories have been on my mind in the last few days.

The first is a Chinese folktale I recently told to my kids at bedtime: A farmer relies on his horse for his living. The horse runs away, and the farmer’s neighbors all come to console him. “Bad luck!” they cry, and “So sorry!”

“We’ll see,” says the farmer.

A few weeks later the horse returns with a second horse, a beautiful nomad stallion.

The neighbors come again, saying “Good luck! Congratulations!”

“We’ll see,” says the farmer.

The farmer’s son loves to ride the new stallion, but one day he is thrown from the saddle and breaks his hip. “Bad luck!  So sorry,” cry the townspeople.

“We’ll see,” says the farmer. “How do you know this isn’t a blessing?”

A few months later soldiers come to the farmer’s village, enlisting every able-bodied man to fight the invading nomad hordes. The story goes that nine of every 10 soldiers are killed in the conflict. The farmer being old and his son being lame, both remained behind to care for each other and their families, so their lives were spared.

How quickly we judge the events in our lives. We are culturally trained to look at life through a lens of preconceived notions. “A” is good or desirable. “B” is bad or undesirable. In my work, I’m increasingly called to not think of situations as “good” or “bad.” This allows me to suspend my preconceptions and inquire more honestly into a situation as it actually is.

The second story on my mind is from my own life. Yesterday I went to drop off my 5 year-old at her dance class. The class, the setting, and the teacher were familiar to both of us from several years of attendance. My plan was to quickly make the drop-off and head to an important meeting where, I imagined, my timely presence was desperately needed. Alas, it was not to be.

We found the classroom, saw the smiling, welcoming, familiar teacher who I know my daughter loves, and exchanged a sweet goodbye. I turned to go, but found my daughter clinging to my leg. Was she shy of the new students? Who can fathom the workings of the five year-old heart? I tried “patiently” for several minutes to convince her to join the group. Even the teacher joined in ― all in vain.

Finally, I decided to sit down with my daughter by the door. She watched the class from my lap, processing. Soon she joined in, casting a nervous glance my way every few seconds.

“I’m going to go,” I mouthed, catching her eye and pointing to the door.

“Not yet,” she mouthed back, shaking her head. Dancing over to me, she leaned in and whispered: “Just another little bit, OK?  I’ll be more comfortable. I’ll tell you when you can go.”

So I sat down and waited, chagrined, delighted, impatient, and relieved. Inside of a minute I got the nod that I could go, but by then I’d relaxed enough to realize my meeting wasn’t all that important. I watched for another minute, waved, and went out into the crisp fall day.

When you find your expectations are not matching what is happening in your life, set aside a minute or two to try this:

  • Consider the uncomfortable, or less-than-perfect circumstance, that is bothering you.
  • Notice whether and how you are pulled to adjust, fix, rationalize or resolve the problem.
  • Then, if necessary, pause, take 10 complete breaths, and just sit with the situation.
  • Consider how this changes your perspective on the situation and helps to clarify what you intend to do.

When we get stressed or lose perspective, it’s easy to feel like the walls are crumbling around us. Pausing for a minute and simply sitting with what’s going on helps remind us that we are bigger than the problem. Then, creativity and curiosity can take root, and we can start to have a bit of fun.

Chandler Yorkhall, BA, NCTMB, AOBTA, is a massage therapist with the Penny George Institute. He works with hospitalized patients.

 


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Art as healing: finding hope and resilience in life’s challenges

Mt Vision Sunrise, a watercolor by Vera Kovacovic

For Vera Kovacovic, watercolor painting is an opportunity to filter a scene through her own lens, capturing its essence rather than its absolute reality.

Alabama Hills Sunrise, a photograph by Nancy Cox

Nature photographer Nancy Cox views her work as a peaceful pause in an otherwise busy world.

By Nancy Cox, RN

In my role as a healing coach at the Virginia Piper Cancer Institute® – Abbott Northwestern Hospital, I like to encourage my clients to pursue their passion, in spite of or in light of their circumstances. If not now, when?

My passion is photography. My partner, Vera Kovacovic, has a passion for watercolor. We travel, I take photographs, and she paints. What a joy to share creative times together. In preparing for the current Art of Healing show at the Virginia Piper Cancer Institute, I thought it would be interesting to have Vera do a watercolor rendition of some of my photos, showing how an image can be seen differently depending on one’s creative eye, talent and perspective.

This is also true about life, especially during challenging times. My intent in my work is to help people see their circumstances with fresh eyes, seeking hope when it appears dim and allowing healing when it seems elusive. I am constantly moved by the resilience of the human spirit and the capacity for healing.

Being primarily a nature photographer encourages me to seek out beauty. I can forget everything else when looking through the lens of a camera. I once spent three hours in 20 below temperatures shooting photos of the trumpeter swans on the Mississippi River in Monticello. By the time I was done I could barely feel my fingers, but I had the best time. It cleared my head, soothed my spirit and ignited a flame that kept me warm. Of course, making a beeline to the closest coffeehouse when I was done didn’t hurt!

Living fully can mean different things to different people. I can’t hike up a steep mountain with 30 pounds of camera equipment on my back trying to get a shot, nor will I risk life and limb. (I ask myself…Is this shot worth a year in physical rehabilitation?) So it forces me to slow down, look deeper and see things differently. This allows me to find my unique vision.

I cannot see life through another person’s lens, only my own. But I can seek understanding. It’s like looking deep into a photograph to see what the artist was trying to convey. Sometimes it is obvious. Other times not so much. That is what I believe Vera does in her interpretation. As a watercolorist, she starts with a blank slate and creates what she sees. She says it is the “essence” of the image through her own personal lens.

That is also what I do in my role as a healing coach. I need to stay aware of my own lens, but be able to go beyond myself and find the true essence of the person who has entrusted himself or herself in my care. It is truly an honor.

Nancy Cox, RN, healing coach, works with people dealing with cancer and their families. She sees clients at the Virginia Piper Cancer Institute – Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis. For appointments, call 612-863-0200.


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Eight fun and healthy family activities around the Twin Cities this fall

You don't have to spend a lot of money to find healthy, fun, family activities for the fall. Just raking the leaves can be a fun event for kids.

You don’t have to spend a lot of money to find healthy, fun, family activities for the fall. Just raking the leaves can be a fun event for kids.

By Courtney Baechler, MD

Once the school year starts, cooler weather hits, and we kick off a season of sweets that starts with Halloween, it can be challenging to find fun family activities that support a healthy lifestyle.

As a mom of two young children, I know this all too well and make an effort to keep our family active year-round.

Here are some of my favorite healthy fall activities and destinations in and around the Twin Cities:

  • Saturday and Sunday trolley rides at Lake Harriet in Minneapolis. This is an oldie, but goodie. My kids love going on the scenic trolley car between Lake Harriet and Lake Calhoun. You can also stop by the park at Lake Harriet, which has climbing options for kids.
  • Renting a bike that seats a family at Minnehaha Falls. Sometimes the most challenging thing with bikes and small children is feeling like you are out of control as a parent. The “Surrey” and “Double Surrey” bikes that you can rent at Minnehaha Falls allow you to get some exercise, stay together and enjoy the scenery.
  • Day trip to Winona, Minn. I’m biased since my husband is from Winona, but it is such a beautiful place to visit. The leaves are gorgeous in October, and there are many opportunities to hike and bike. You can try the flat walking path around Lake Winona. Or, if you want a challenge, try hiking the Garvin Heights Overlook and the Sugar Loaf Bluff. You can grab some apples on your way back in Lake City on the south shore of Lake Pepin.
  • Healthy kids food alert. I can’t say enough positive things about the restaurant Agra Culture in Edina, Minn. They prepare healthy, kid-friendly food quickly. You can choose from protein bowls, great salads and breakfasts that include quinoa. The food is served cafeteria style, making it easier to get in and out with young kids.
  • Raking leaves in the yard. It’s free, easy and a great workout. Plus, my kids love the crunch and smell of the leaves, along with the undivided attention.
  • Pinehaven Farm, Wyoming, Minn. A relatively short drive from Minneapolis, you will find this a great place to enjoy some Halloween fun. It is complete with a petting zoo, corn maze, pumpkin patch and face painting. There are activities for family members of every age with a wide variety of interests.
  • Bowling at Pinstripes in Edina or Town Hall in Minneapolis. We often do this when it rains on the weekend. While it’s not the most active pastime, at least we get away from a screen. My kids enjoy a game of bowling or bocce ball at Pinstripes, and we can take a short walk around Centennial Lakes afterwards. I find both Pinstripes and Town Hall have some healthier options on their menus for parents and kids.
  • Monster Dash Fun Run. My daughter and I will complete this 5K this year. It’s a great way to dress up in a costume and enjoy a short run or walk. The most important thing we can do as a role model is lead by example when it comes to exercise. If you didn’t sign-up this year, come watch and make a plan for next year.

Courtney Baechler, MD, is a practicing physician with and the vice president of the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing. She has a master’s degree in clinical epidemiology from the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health.


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A talk on managing menopause with Dr. Debra Bell and Nutritionist Sue Moores

Debra Bell, MD, will talk about holistic approaches to managing menopause with Nutritionist Sue Moores at an October event in Minneapolis.

Debra Bell, MD, will talk about holistic approaches to managing menopause with Nutritionist Sue Moores at an October event in Minneapolis.

In last week’s LiveWell blog entry, Busting Menopause Myths, we dispelled some menopause misconceptions. We also offered a few holistic tips for managing symptoms like hot flashes, mood changes and sleeplessness.

Later this month, Debra Bell, MD, of the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing, and Sue Moores, a nutritionist with Kowalki’s Market, will team up to tackle this topic in person at An Integrative Approach to Managing Menopause. Attend to learn how to deal with symptoms through diet and integrative wellness strategies. Discover which foods trigger symptoms and which can help boost metabolism. Come with questions, and walk away with tips for being well.

The Kowalski’s event will be held Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, from 6:30-8 p.m. in Minneapolis at Mt. Zion Lutheran Church, which is across from Kowalski’s Parkview Market.

Learn more or register here.

 


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Busting menopause myths

WomensHealth

Healthy living – exercise, sleep, good nutrition, and avoiding excessive alcohol and caffeine – is the first step in managing the symptoms of menopause, according to Debra Bell, MD, of the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing.

This article will run in the upcoming issue of the LiveWell® Newsletter of the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing

Contrary to popular belief, menopause isn’t just about estrogen.

In reality, there are many hormones involved, including several types of estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA and pregnenolone. Aging can affect other hormones as well, such as those that control metabolism and other body functions.

Another misperception about menopause is that it reflects a hormone imbalance. “Menopause is not a state of imbalance, and it is not a disease. It is a state of change,” said Debra Bell, MD, an integrative medicine doctor at Penny George Institute for Health and Healing.

Adding to this complexity, fluctuations in hormone levels affect women differently. In fact, the severity of menopause symptoms is not directly related to an individual’s hormone levels. That’s why Bell does not routinely check hormone levels when a woman is experiencing symptoms.

But this does not mean women have to simply endure menopause.

Bell said her goal is to help women go through this change with the least amount of symptoms. “What we do depends on what else they are doing in their lifestyle and what their symptoms are.”

While hormone replacement may have a role in helping some women, “I think it’s important to not just focus on hormone replacement,” said Bell. She recommends that women take a more holistic approach.

“Healthy living is the first step: exercise, sleep, good nutrition, avoiding excessive alcohol and caffeine. For many women, this is enough to keep their symptoms in check. For others for whom that’s not enough, there are many treatments that can help,” said Bell.

That includes dietary supplements, herbal preparations, acupuncture, mind-body techniques and more. For example, Bell often prescribes black cohosh and vitex to treat hot flashes, anxiety and other symptoms. “Herbals often work together synergistically, so we put different herbs together to address different symptoms,” she said. Before considering herbs or supplements, it is best to check with a health care practitioner.

Bell encourages women to view menopause as a new stage of life and to be open to adapting to it. “This is more about a process than a quick fix. We should be thinking about what we can do to be healthy at different stages of our lives.”

Going through menopause? Help yourself with these tips:

• Eat wholesome foods.
• Avoid sweets, alcohol and caffeine.
• Get regular exercise. Aim for at least 30 minutes a day.
• Try yoga, meditation and other relaxation techniques.
• Try acupuncture.

If you do not have other medical problems and are not taking prescription medicines, consider supplements or herbal remedies that are formulated to address menopause symptoms. These should be purchased from a reputable natural foods store.

Consult with an integrative medicine provider if:
• Your symptoms are very disruptive and make you uncomfortable.
• Your symptoms are affecting your sleep, your work life or your relationships.
• You have tried addressing the symptoms on your own without success.
• You are not sure if your symptoms are related to menopause or to something else.

Debra Bell, MD, sees patients at the Penny George Institute – Abbott Northwestern in Minneapolis. For appointments, call 612-863-3333. See her profile at wellness.allinahealth.org/bell.