LiveWell®

Wellness and prevention information from the experts at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing


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Health benefits of turmeric

Tumeric.455656335By Mary Beshara, MSN, APRN

If you haven’t already heard about the wonderful health properties of turmeric― the main spice in curry―let me educate you.

Here are results from research showing turmeric’s possible health benefits:

  • The brain – Researchers are exploring the link between turmeric and its positive effects on certain brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Circulation –  A 2007 study showed that curcumin, the yellow pigment that is the active compound in turmeric, may aid in reducing levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), or “bad cholesterol.”
  • Inflammation Researchers at the University of Arizona have found evidence to support turmeric’s reputation as an anti-inflammatory agent for joint inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Cancer – A recent study showed turmeric to be effective in slowing the growth of breast cancer cells in mice and in delaying the progression of the disease into the lungs. The study is being conducted at the University of Texas’ MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.
  • The gut – Turmeric may help people with the digestive disease ulcerative colitis stay in remission, according to a 2006 study.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. I get very excited to see that simple food choices can make a big impact on healthy living. It can be a challenge, though, to get turmeric into your diet. I was raised on a lot of wonderful foods and spices, but turmeric wasn’t one of them. It can be tricky if you are not used to this flavor.

I want to share with you two recipes that are easy ones for getting some turmeric in your diet. They are from the Web site of Arjan Khalsa, a chiropractor.

The first of the recipes is for Turmeric Paste. Once you have this made, you can store it in the refrigerator in a glass container for up to three weeks. You can use it by the teaspoon in soups, yogurt, or eggs ― anything you choose. Experimentation can be your guide. But don’t be surprised if you walk away with a yellow-colored tongue. It’s perfectly harmless and goes away quickly.

The second of the recipes is for golden milk. It is amazingly calming. You can drink it right before bedtime to help with falling asleep. I also enjoy it in the morning while I drive to work. It calms me down, and I like knowing that it is reducing inflammation in my body.

We’re just starting to understand how turmeric can benefit our health.

I do recommend that if you are going to integrate turmeric or curcumin supplements into your diet, please check with your physician or health care professional first. And always consult with them before making any significant changes in your diet or lifestyle.

Mary Beshara is a board certified Clinical Nurse Specialist in adult health and pain management who sees patients at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – Abbott Northwestern Outpatient Clinic. She integrates into her practice complementary therapies such as relaxation techniques, integrative imagery, aromatherapyreflexologyhealing touch and breath work.

 

 

 

 


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A primer on probiotics – what’s all the hype about?

78652423.womaneatingyogurt.probioticsBy Jeannie Paris, RD, LD

Probiotics is a term that we hear about much more often than we did even a couple of years ago. Pick up any magazine and you’re likely to see an ad for probiotics. So why all the hype? 

Research confirms that foods and supplements with probiotics may provide benefits for many digestive problems and may even help promote a healthy immune system. This is because probiotics are organisms, such as bacteria or yeast, that are likely to improve health.

I find it fascinating that our digestive system is home to more than 500 different types of bacteria. Digestive disorders can happen when the balance of friendly bacteria in the intestines becomes disturbed. This may occur after an infection or after taking antibiotics, especially if taken for a long period of time.

Probiotics come in many forms, such as powders, capsules and liquids, and even in numerous foods.

If you wish to increase your probiotic intake through food, here are some top sources:

  • yogurt with “live and active cultures”
  • unpasteurized sauerkraut and the Korean dish kimchi
  • miso (fermented soybeans)
  • some fermented soft cheeses, like Gouda
  • kefir, which is thick, creamy and like a drinkable yogurt
  • acidophilus milk or buttermilk
  • sour pickles naturally fermented without vinegar
  • tempeh, which is made from fermented soybeans.

Probiotics in a supplement form may be more convenient than food and may also allow for targeting more specific microbes, including bacteria and yeast. Although they don’t offer the nutrition that foods can provide, supplements may provide higher levels of probiotics.

Different strains of probiotics provide different benefits. When using probiotics for a specific cause, such as support of the immune system or for diarrhea associated with antibiotic use, it is important to get guidance from a health care provider.

For most people, probiotics are safe and cause few side effects. For hundreds of years, people world-wide have been eating foods containing live cultures.

Still, probiotics (supplements and foods) could be dangerous for people with weakened immune systems or serious illnesses. As with all nutritional supplements, probiotics should be taken according to the directions and with the guidance of a physician or health care provider.

Here’s to eating more “friendly bacteria!”

Jeannie Paris, RD, LD, is a Registered Dietician with the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing. To make an appointment with Paris, call the LiveWell Fitness Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital at 612-863-5178 or the Penny George Institute – Unity Hospital at 763-236-5656.

For more information on digestive health, read LiveWell blog entry,“Can you trust your gut?” by Greg Plotnikoff, MD.


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Responding to health headlines on the value of multivitamins and supplements

Vitamins.162362665An editorial in the Annals of Internal Medicine last month suggested that multivitamins and supplements are a “waste of money.” The editorial bases its opinion on the results from three recent studies on the effects of these supplements.

The editorial was quickly picked up by national news organizations with headlines varying from “Studies say multivitamins don’t prevent disease” to “Research shows multivitamins provide some benefits.” Practitioners from the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing regularly recommend supplements to their patients and wanted to weigh in on the issue.

Two practitioners offered their opinions:

Bell_Debra_2013Debra Bell, MD, offers an integrative medicine, or holistic approach, to women’s health, fibromyalgia, fatigue, allergies, chronic disease and nutrition.

Bell questioned whether the original editorial really reflected the studies. Each study report cautioned against broad conclusions, while the editorial ended by stating the case was closed and that multivitamins should not be used for chronic disease prevention.

Bell says: “I believe it is the summary of the editorial that generated the media buzz. This final sentence is a reflection of an important issue – the frustration of the medical community with the multi-billion dollar dietary supplement industry.  The large majority of supplements are poorly manufactured with the primary intent of generating revenue.  This irresponsible behavior undermines the dedicated work of professionals researching and developing good quality supplements.”

She added, “The various articles ignore that there is a respected group of professionals in Integrative Medicine who apply the large database of evidence demonstrating the efficacy of many natural supplements and vitamins.  Most Integrative Medicine specialists would agree that the best way to obtain nutrients is from diet, but sometimes multivitamins or supplements are necessary or helpful.”

Blair_JenniferJennifer Blair, LAc, MaOM, is an integrative, holistic provider with clinical specialties in acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, dietary therapy and integrative health coaching. She is a licensed acupuncturist with a master’s degree in Oriental Medicine.

Blair agrees with Bell that the presence of poor quality supplements in the marketplace degrades a valuable asset to the health and well-being of patients.  “Appropriate nutritional supplementation, individualized to a patient’s unique needs and provided by companies who focus on quality, safety, efficacy and optimal absorption can benefit health and address nutritional deficiencies that contribute to diseased states and inhibit the body’s natural regenerative abilities. We miss the whole picture when we allow media sound bites to guide our beliefs and decisions.”

Additionally, Blair points out that multiple factors contribute to sub-optimal nutrition that may lead to the need for quality supplements.  These may include some industrialized agriculture practices, poor soil quality and over-processed foods. “Combine these factors with inhibited digestive function due to inflammation or an imbalance of intestinal flora, and it can be difficult to absorb the proper nutrition from food alone,” she said.

Debra Bell, MD, and Jennifer Blair, LAc, MaOM, see patients at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – Abbott Northwestern outpatient clinic.


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A look at declining fitness for kids around the world

BaechlerChildren are now slower runners than their parents were, according to new data from the American Heart Association.

The study showed that around the world, children are 15 percent less fit than their parents were during childhood. In the United States, childhood cardiovascular performance declined between 1970 and 2000.

Courtney Baechler, MD, a cardiologist and vice president of the Penny George™ Institute for Health and Healing, discussed these finding on Minnesota Public Radio’s The Daily Circuit. Listen to the segment.


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Getting to know gluten – what’s up with this new food issue?

Gluten is a hot topic. If you’ve been wondering what all the buzz is about, consider attending “Getting to Know Gluten – What’s Up with this New Food Issue” at Kowalski’s Woodbury Market from 6:30-8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013.

This class will feature Greg Plotnikoff, MD, integrative medicine physician with the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing, and Sue Moores, Kowalski’s Nutritionist. They will discuss celiac disease versus non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the pros and cons of testing and elimination diets, and ideas for delicious gluten-free eating.

Register here.


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My path to the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing

Debra Bell, MD, hiking wth her husband, Daniel Wolpert.

Debra Bell, MD, hiking wth her husband.

By Debra Bell, MD

This fall marks the start of a new chapter for me in a more than 25-year journey as a family medicine and integrative medicine physician.

In September, I started offering integrative medicine consultations alongside two other physicians and a clinical nurse specialist at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing – Abbott Northwestern Outpatient Clinic. I am part of a team of integrative health practitioners, including acupuncturists, massage therapists, integrative nutritionists, and a psychologist.

As a new team member, I’ve been asked to introduce myself and my style of practice. Doing that requires giving you some history on how I got here.

I consider my work in health care a calling. I was exposed at an early age to medicine and drawn to the notion of helping people. As a pre-med student, I became interested in women’s studies and birthing practices. I found inspiration from my mother’s first edition books from the 1950s and 1960s about natural childbirth and breastfeeding and went on to study natural remedies used by midwives and ancient healers.

In medical school, I took a year off to concentrate on an independent study of natural medicine. I met my husband, and we spent 10 months traveling internationally visiting spiritual communities around the world. This led us to choose a simple life in which health and spiritual well-being are a priority.

We moved to Vermont, where we had a small, commercial, organic farm. I started an integrative medicine family practice and home birth private practice. Later we moved to California, where my husband attended graduate school, and I worked in a practice with other integrative medicine providers. I enjoyed having like-minded colleagues, and we learned a lot from each other.

From California, we moved to Crookston, Minn. People often ask how we ended up moving to northwest Minnesota. Divine intervention? I felt drawn to the area for a number of reasons. I found the open space and big sky breathtaking. In my practice, I could offer my services to a broader population, and the clinic at the local hospital was very supportive.

I was pleased by the number of community members who previously had never considered natural therapies but decided to come to see me because they wanted a holistic approach. Often, they did not want another prescription and did want to address more than physical symptoms. With an integrative medicine approach, we could address all aspects of well-being and healing ― work life, home life, exercise, diet, stress, coping skills, emotional well-being, and spirituality

Holistic medicine refers to focusing on the “body mind and spirit,” but often there is less emphasis on the “spirit.” I try to make sure I focus on all three.

In time, I created an integrative medicine center in partnership with the hospital. I worked with acupuncturists, massage therapists, spiritual directors and others as a team to provide holistic care.

After 13 years in Crookston, I am ready for this new chapter at the Penny George Institute. I’m looking forward to working with a remarkable team of practitioners and serving patients in Minneapolis and the greater Twin Cities area.

Debra Bell, MD, is now seeing patients. She offers an integrative medicine, or holistic, approach, to women’s health, fibromyalgia, fatigue, allergies, chronic disease and nutrition. Call 612-863-3333 to learn more or schedule an appointment.


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Top breast cancer fighting foods

Plotnikoff_Greg_webGregory Plotnikoff, MD, MTS, FACP, talked about top breast cancer fighting foods and how our diet contributes to estrogen metabolism, an important risk factor for breast cancer on KARE 11 news @4  on Wednesday. Watch the KARE 11 news segment to learn more.

Plotnikoff also will be a featured speaker at the Minnesota-based Breast Cancer Awareness Association’s 12th Annual Education Conference on Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013 at the Minneapolis Convention Center. The purpose of the event is to help anyone affected by breast cancer with treatment, survivorship and support.

Plotnikoff is a board-certified internist who has received numerous national and international honors for his work in integrative medicine. He practices at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing.


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Nutrition: The benefits of the Mediterranean Diet

 Man enjoying the Mediterranean dietThis article originally ran in the Healing Journal newsletter of the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing.

A recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine earlier this year found that about 30 percent of heart attacks, strokes and deaths from heart attack could be prevented in people if they switch to a Mediterranean style diet. The results of the study were so overwhelmingly clear that the study was stopped early.

“The Mediterranean diet is not a specific diet plan or program,” said Jeannie Paris, RD, LD, integrative nutritionist with the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing. “Rather, it is a collection of eating habits followed by people in the Mediterranean region including Greece, southern Italy and Spain.”

According to Paris, the diet is characterized by abundant plant foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, olive oil and a moderate amount of fatty fish or lean poultry. Some people following the eating style may consume a small amount of red wine with meals. The lifestyle in the Mediterranean region also places an emphasis on being physically active and enjoying meals with family and loved ones. The Mediterranean diet is also known for what it does not include: very little or no
red meat, trans fatty acids from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, foods high in sugar or processed foods.

“Along with reducing the risk for heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular diseases, the Mediterranean diet may be helpful in reducing the risk of cancer, obesity, type II diabetes and other chronic illnesses,” said Paris. “The premise is that certain types of foods cause inflammation, including foods high in refined sugars or flours and foods that contain trans fatty acids, which are prevalent in the typical Western modern diet.”

Tips for incorporating a Mediterranean-style diet into daily life:

  • Emphasize plant proteins. Nuts, small seeds and legumes provide healthy protein and fiber. Experiment with new options, such as chia seeds, which are easily added to Greek yogurt or oatmeal.
  • Keep moving. Try to move more throughout the day. It doesn’t need to be an hour at the gym. Short walks spread in five to 10-minute increments throughout the day offer great benefits. Try to aim for 10,000 steps, which you are able to monitor through a pedometer or another tool, such as a Fitbit.
  • Make fruits and vegetables the center of your meals. One of the most important things to do to improve your diet is to shift your thinking from making meat the center of a meal to making plants the center of your meals.
  • Plan your meals around the fruits and vegetables. Aim for a variety of colors. The goal should be seven to nine servings a day of fruits and vegetables, but even five servings a day would make a big difference in improving most people’s diets.
  • Fish and poultry are healthier than red meat. If you include animal proteins in your diet, emphasize fish or poultry over red meat. Red meat is high in saturated fat. Cold-water fish, such as salmon, sardines, mackerel and swordfish, are high in healthy omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Use fruit as a dessert. In the Mediterranean diet, whole fruit is often served as a dessert. This is a much healthier option than our typical desserts, which are high in refined
    sugars. The key is to shop for fruit in season, when it naturally tastes its best.
  • If something is good for you, more is not necessarily better. In the study, participants were not limited on the amount of olive oil they could use and were actually instructed to use at least four tablespoons a day. They were told  to avoid all commercially made cookies, cakes and pastries and to limit dairy and meat. Olive oil, nuts and avocados are rich sources of monosaturated fat, but do provide a high amount of calories in rather small servings. Olive oil contains about 120 calories per tablespoon. To prevent weight gain, it’s important to limit unhealthier food choices when healthier monounsaturated fat sources are added in one’s diet. For olive oil, Paris recommends pouring extra virgin olive oil into a spritzer bottle and then spray your fish or vegetables before cooking instead of pouring the olive oil directly into the pan.
  • Seek expert help. Paris works with clients and offers one-on-one integrative nutrition counseling and metabolism testing.

Olive Oil Dressing

Olive Oil Salad Dressing
A very easy, flavor-filled dressing that goes with any kind of salad.

1 tablespoon olive oil
1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar
3 tablespoons seedless raspberry jam (could use no sugar added jam or fresh raspberries in season)

Combine the three ingredients in a blender or shaker and process until smooth. Store in a jar in the refrigerator. Ingredient amounts can be adjusted for desired batch size and also to individual liking.

Delicious over a bed of spinach or mixed greens with strawberries, blueberries and a sprinkle of sliced almonds, walnut pieces or chia seeds.

To make an appointment with Paris, call the LiveWell Fitness Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital at 612-863-5178 or the Penny George Institute – Unity Hospital at 763-236-5656.


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Mindful eating for the real world

Livewell_61813-4947.HealthCoaching.ForFB

Molly Ellefson (right) offers one-on-one integrative health and wellness coaching sessions.

By Molly Ellefson, MS, CHWC

Mindful eating, a concept based on Buddhist traditions, is a process of putting all your focus on the food you are eating. You eat slowly with no distractions, while noticing all the nuances of each bite: temperature, texture, flavors, and sensations in your body.

While this can be a powerful experience, most of us aren’t able to eat like this all of the time. Then, how do we eat mindfully in the real world?

In her book, “Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat,” Dr. Michelle May defines mindful eating as “eating with intention and attention.” When you eat with intention, there is a purpose for eating – to satisfy hunger, fuel your body and for enjoyment. When you eat with attention, you tune in to the sensations and flavors of what you are eating. You also pay attention to your body’s internal cues about satisfaction and fullness.

Here are six ways to build mindfulness into your meals:
1. Before you eat, take a minute to think about why you want to eat. Are you physically hungry, bored or are you eating by the clock?
2. Remember that true hunger is a physical sensation. Physical hunger can feel like an empty or shrinking feeling in your stomach. You may also feel the effects of low blood sugar, such as: irritability, trouble concentrating, light headed, nauseated, or have a headache.
3. When planning what to eat, think about what foods make you feel good physically. The goal of mindful eating is to feel better when you’re finished eating, not worse.
4. Consider balance when choosing what to eat. What does your body need and what have you already eaten? Do you need vegetables, fruit, protein, carbs or fat?
5. Think about what foods make you feel satisfied and allow yourself to have them. Remember that satisfaction is both mental and physical. Deprivation of our favorite foods rarely works. How many times have you said to yourself, “I’m never having ice cream again,” only to find eating a pint of Häagen-Daaz two weeks later.
6. While eating, pause periodically. Put your fork down, take a couple of deep breaths and check in with your body and your taste-buds. Notice if you feel any sensations in your stomach or if the food is starting to lose its luster. If we pay attention, even when eating our favorite foods, we may notice that things become too salty, sweet, creamy, etc.

Try one or two of these tips at your next meal. You may notice that you feel much more satisfied when you eat when truly hungry and eat the foods that make you feel satisfied. If you balance eating for nutrition with eating for pleasure, you are eating mindfully. Eating is one of life’s great pleasures – just make sure it isn’t the only one!

Molly Ellefson, MS, CHWC, is an Integrative health and wellness coach with the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing’s LiveWell Fitness Center. She will be teaching the eight-session “Am I hungry?® Mindful Eating Workshop,” based on May’s book, starting Sept. 25. Learn more about the class.


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Tips for aging well: Nutrition

This article is originally from the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing‘s Spring 2013 Healing Journal.

When it comes to aging and its effects on your body, everyone is different.

According to licensed nutritionist Carolyn Denton, MA, LN, there are general things that tend to happen as we grow older and pass through the decades, but one thing is certain: it’s never too late, or too early, to start eating better.

“The human body is built to last,” said Denton. “As we age, our digestive system may slow down a bit, we may lose some lean body mass and may suffer from insulin resistance.”

With nutrition, the recommendations don’t change much through life’s stages: get plenty of fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains. The loss of body mass and lean tissue does usually translate into a lower metabolic rate. So, the number of calories you need to maintain or lose weight will be reduced and we have a tendency to gain weight more quickly if we take in more calories than our bodies require. Denton notes that once women go through menopause, they often notice a big difference in their resting metabolic rate.

To combat the reduced amount of calories our bodies need, we need to reduce the calories
and increase exercise. It may sound simple, but it is often challenging.

At different stages of life, a busy work schedule, family commitments or more time spent alone, may affect how you eat. “This may lead to skipped meals or not getting enough variety of foods that people need for good nutrition,” said Denton. For example, people may decide to repeatedly have a bowl of cereal for dinner. To help, she suggests cooking ahead and freezing meals for future use.

Tips for eating healthy as we age
Think plants. There is no substitute. Plants contain so many vitamins, nutrients, minerals, phytonutrients, fiber and complex carbohydrates that it is impossible to replicate the benefits of food from plants with supplements or highly processed foods. We hear it all the time, but it’s worth repeating: eat your fruits and vegetables.

Make every calorie count. Smaller portions of nutrient-dense foods are important as we age. When we eat foods that are high in nutrients compared to calorie count, we are ensuring that we get the nutrients we need to keep our bodies functioning at their full potential. A diet made up primarily of vegetables and legumes prepared with healthy fats, herbs and spices is a good place to start.

Stay hydrated. As we age, we may not notice as quickly when we become dehydrated. Of all nutrients, water is the most important. Water reduces stress on the kidneys, making those organs function properly. It also helps with digestion and helps to reduce blood clots. Dehydration is so dangerous that it may lead to stroke. The importance of water in our diet should not be underestimated.

Think of the diet as a work of art. To describe a work of art, one may describe its color, texture and balance, along with variety, proportion and accessibility. You could view your diet in the same way. Aim for variety in color, texture and balance. Spending time planning and preparing for meals is important and will pay benefits as you age.

It is possible to eat healthy on a budget. It requires a little preparation and creativity, but there are many healthy foods that are inexpensive. Buy dried legumes and invest the time in soaking, straining and then cooking them. Frozen fruits and vegetables are a nutritious alternative to fresh. Homemade stocks are inexpensive to make by using peels and ends from other vegetables you prepare. Just freeze them for the time you are ready to make a stock and throw them in the pot.

Try some neglected foods. Celery, which is usually left over on the relish tray once all of the other vegetables are eaten, is one of the most powerful detoxifying foods available. Certain foods are known for healthy properties. Weave them into your diet. What you didn’t like when you were younger may taste delicious to you now. Some examples of things to try: leeks, garlic, scallions, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, beets, kale, eggplant, bok choy, endive and more.

Vitamins have a purpose, but it’s impossible to replicate real food. Supplements have a purpose if someone is low in certain areas such as calcium, zinc or magnesium. Low magnesium levels, for example, will cause muscle spasms. Supplements should be used as a bridge and support for a healthy diet, not a replacement.

To make an appointment with Denton, call 612-863-3333.

Carolyn Denton is a licensed nutritionist with the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing.